The Valdez Star - Serving Prince William Sound and Copper River Basin

 

Articles written by Ned Rozell

Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 201

 By Ned Rozell    Main News    March 22, 2017 

Squirrels somehow predict Spruce seed bonanza

Stan Boutin has climbed more than 5,000 spruce trees in the last 30 years. He's fallen only once, and he has often returned to the forest floor knowing if a ball of twigs and moss contained newborn red squirrel pups. Over the years, those squirrels...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    March 15, 2017

Far-north mallards thriving on the edge in sub-zero temperatures

With dogs' breath fogging the 30-below zero air at their knees, 71 Iditarod mushers steamed their way down the frozen Chena River in Fairbanks on March 6. Upstream, just a few miles behind them, 500 d...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    March 8, 2017

Far-north lake trout living in mystery in Arctic Coastal Plain

In early March up on the frozen Arctic Coastal Plain, as the wind sculpts snow into drifts, it's hard to tell northern lakes from surrounding tundra. But lurking deep beneath that flat white world are toothy predators as long as your arm. In pools...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    March 1, 2017

Are more tropical days and nights in Alaska's future?

By the end of this century, Alaskans may be enjoying tropical evening breezes for about a week each year. That's an increase from the almost zero such nights we currently savor. But it could happen, according to a graduate student who has tightened...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    February 22, 2017

Are we living in a warm peak between ice ages?

As another major rainstorm hit California in February, downtown San Francisco surpassed its normal rain total for an entire year. Reservoirs in the high country were spilling over. So ended a five-year drought in the state that some people attributed...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    February 16, 2017

Cold War inspired first launch from Poker Flat in Alaska

When they launch, the four rockets now pointed northward from Poker Flat Research Range will add to the 345 that have arced over northern Alaska during the past 48 years. Recently, Chuck Deehr remembered number one. Deehr is a retired space...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    February 8, 2017

Sleuthing the site of a century-old earthquake in the north

The second-largest earthquake on the planet in 1904 happened somewhere in Alaska. It could have been St. Michael, Rampart, Fairbanks, Coldfoot or a place called Sunrise on the Kenai Peninsula. People felt the magnitude 7.3 at each place. If an...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    February 1, 2017

Lack of sea ice and Lower 48 weather are interconnected

Last month, villagers in Savoonga landed a bowhead whale. Before 2017, in every January people can remember, sea ice surrounded St. Lawrence Island, locking it in for the winter. Boat-launching and...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 25, 2017

Scientists try to mitigate methane - from cows

Many creatures, including you and me, emit methane from time to time. Microbes within our guts break down one substance and turn it into another, making methane in the process. Northern lakes and...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    January 18, 2017

An open letter to deep Interior cold weather

Hello old friend. I thought you were dead. Sorry, but remember last year, when you didn't show up? It was the first recorded winter in Fairbanks when the thermometer at the airport didn't register...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    January 4, 2017

The rigors of research in the cold of the Far North

Rod Boertje knew it was getting cold when the Park Service took the dogs inside. Boertje, then a graduate student in wildlife biology at the University of Alaska, was doing a study on caribou in Denali National Park in the early 1980s. Park rangers,...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    December 7, 2016

To Alaska and then some for Yukon lynx tracked by researchers

A lynx that roamed more than 200 miles from Kluane Lake in the Yukon Territory to near Chitina is still being tracked across the Alaska landscape, thanks to a curious couple living off the Edgerton Hi...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 30, 2016

To the opposite end of the Earth with a purpose

Joanna Young does not seem to fear change very much. The spunky redhead first came to Fairbanks from Egypt, where her parents were teaching English and running a school. Raised in Toronto, she knew what cold was. But this was January 2010, a...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 23, 2016

Alaska taking shape near Yakutat in Disenchantment Bay

The forces shaping Alaska never sleep, especially near Yakutat. I once visited the fishing town of about 800 people and many dogs. My assignment was to write about scientists studying Hubbard...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 16, 2016

A visit to one of Earth's great canyons in a sub

People wait years for permits to raft the Grand Canyon. Michelle Ridgway once visited a much larger canyon in Alaska, one that most people will never hear about. Zhemchug Canyon, 20 percent longer and deeper than Grand Canyon, is a t-shaped cut in...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 2, 2016

Birds employ numerous winter survival strategies

Biologist Susan Sharbaugh, formerly of the Alaska Bird Observatory, once spoke about the strategies birds employ to survive in our season of darkness and cold. She talked about the flighty birds that...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 26, 2016

Engineering adaptations to high water in vulnerable communities

After Hurricane Ike in 2008 shoved six feet of water into downtown Galveston, Texas, people there had the attention of all America. But two days later, lawyers for Lehman Brothers filed the largest ba...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 19, 2016

Life on barrier islands, north and south of the USA

GALVESTON, TEXAS - Here on this alligator-shaped mound of sand, the temperature of 88 is the warmest recorded this late in the season since weather observers started writing them down in 1871....

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 12, 2016

Pondering the infinite in Yukon Flats and ocean of sky

YUKON FLATS - Out here, in a smooth plain stretching over Alaska's wrinkled face, water and tree and mud dissolve to fuzz at each horizon. No hills or bumps. An ocean of sky. An observer once said...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 5, 2016

Living on a glacier, thinking about rocks for a few summers

CANWELL GLACIER - This summer, Sam Herreid has slept for 12 nights on these rocks that ride slowly downhill on a mass of ice. For a few days at a time during the last six summers, the 28-year-old has...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    September 28, 2016

Earth's expanding crust swallowed beneath Aleutians

Sometimes, a great idea arrives ahead of its time. A person squints at a raw landscape, thinks about it in his bunk on a heaving ship, dreams of it. He scribbles a diagram. He remains quiet years...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    September 14, 2016

The Pleistocene sounds of the season up north

UAF FARM FIELDS: Gliding in with their wings folded like paper airplanes, nine Canada geese drop their paddle feet and prepare to land in a corner of this cleared plain. On this early fall day, the...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    September 7, 2016

Rabies endures with help of the arctic fox

Rabies is a death sentence for any animal. Experts have wondered how a virus survives when it kills all the creatures it infects. "We don't have a really good answer to that," said UAF's Karsten Hueffer. "It probably has to do with the long...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    August 31, 2016

Exotic ticks found on Alaska dogs, Alaskans

While Alaskans have long endured dense mosquitoes and frigid air, we've always had the absence of venomous snakes and dog ticks. But the latter may be establishing themselves here. Ticks that infest red squirrels, snowshoe hares and a variety of bird...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    August 24, 2016

The state of the state, 110 years ago according to Brooks

Alfred Brooks was a geologist who traveled thousands of miles in Alaska and left his name on the state's northernmost mountain range. Twenty years before his death in 1924, he also left behind a summary of what Alaska was like more than one century...

 

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