The Valdez Star - Serving Prince William Sound and Copper River Basin

 

Articles written by Ned Rozell

Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 169

 By NED ROZELL    Main News    June 22, 2016 

Summer solstice doesn't mean maximum warmth

A person might think that since we get our maximum sunlight on the summer solstice (on or about June 21), we should also get our peak warmth then. The sun's calling the shots, right? Not entirely, said former Alaskan Martha Shulski, author of "The...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    June 15, 2016

Foam on the water a sign of life and death

While sitting in the front of a canoe on a twisty Alaska creek, my daughter asked to steer closer to the riverbank. She wanted to grab some suds. There, caught in the elbows of fallen trees, were...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    June 8, 2016

Much of the Arctic is lower than it was before

When botanist Janet Jorgenson first visited a patch of tundra east of Kaktovik in 1988, it was flat, dry and thick with 29 species of lichens and mosses. Now, Tapkaurak is wet, gullied and fragrant...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    June 1, 2016

Fire breaks down and builds up boreal forest

I once wrote about how fire had ravaged more than 10 percent of Interior Alaska during two smoky summers. A wildlife biologist called me out for choosing an inadequate verb. Tom Paragi chooses words that are more positive when he looks at a burned...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    May 25, 2016

Moose flies a high-summer Alaska pest of big proportions

While boating down the Yukon River during the hottest summer recorded in Alaska (1915, when Fort Yukon reached 100 degrees Fahrenheit), missionary Hudson Stuck wrote about the wildlife that most...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    May 16, 2016

Big changes on a big Alaska peninsula in the past 50 years

Larger than West Virginia, the Kenai Peninsula has the best of Alaska: coastal rainforests, two icefields, majestic deep-water fiords and a sapphire river home to the largest king salmon ever caught. It also has some of the best-documented changes...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    May 11, 2016

Much of the Arctic is lower than it was before

When botanist Janet Jorgenson first visited a patch of tundra east of Kaktovik in 1988, it was flat, dry and thick with 29 species of lichens and mosses. Now, Tapkaurak is wet, gullied and fragrant...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    May 4, 2016

Yukon River breaking up with a whimper this spring

CIRCLE - As the pilot of a chartered Cessna 206 curved in for a land-ing above the Yukon River, his passengers squinted at white river ice that clung to the south bank near town. Chocolate brown open...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    April 27, 2016

Frog calls signal the change of season in Alaska

NEAR BALLAINE LAKE - Over the blat of engines and hum of tires on nearby Farmers Loop, Mark Spangler hears the chuckles of the animal he is studying. Male wood frogs in a one-acre pond on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks are singing...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    April 27, 2016

Frog calls signal the change of season in Alaska

NEAR BALLAINE LAKE - Over the blat of engines and hum of tires on nearby Farmers Loop, Mark Spangler hears the chuckles of the animal he is studying. Male wood frogs in a one-acre pond on the campus...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    April 26, 2016

Frog calls signal the change of season in Alaska

NEAR BALLAINE LAKE - Over the blat of engines and hum of tires on nearby Farmers Loop, Mark Spangler hears the chuckles of the animal he is studying. Male wood frogs in a one-acre pond on the campus...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    April 20, 2016

White creatures changing with the northern season

This morning, through the west window, I noticed a flash of white. I looked up from breakfast to see a short-tailed weasel popping from a hole in the snowpack. He was sleek and streamlined and...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    April 6, 2016

The giant wave of Icy Bay: a look back to last October

A landslide last fall caused a giant wave of the type not seen in Alaska since the storied 1958 event in Lituya Bay. After a period of heavy rains, a mountainside near Tyndall Glacier col-lapsed into...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    March 30, 2016

Thule people had northern life figured out archeologists find

About 1,000 years ago, Norse explorer Leif Ericson bumped into the New World at Newfoundland. The old world was filling up, with 300,000 people living in the Roman capital of Constantinople. Up here...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    March 23, 2016

Ghost ship artifacts emerge in museum years later

Ships with no humans aboard have long ridden the seas, often floating with supernatural stories of being piloted by dead crew members or becoming visible to sailors and then vanishing. Alaska has its...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    March 16, 2016

Broken ice causes the worst spring breakup floods

For half the year, Alaska's big rivers provide a somewhat flat surface, allowing travel by snowmachine, dog team, ski, bike, snowshoe and foot. For a few weeks during their spring transition to liquid water, those useful ribbons of ice become a threa...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    March 9, 2016

Barrow's extreme spring of one year ago broke records

For a town of its size (4,300 people), Barrow receives more visits by scientists than anyplace in America. The northernmost community in the U.S. has hosted researchers since Army Lieutenant P. Henry...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    March 2, 2016

The many signs of northern change in climate

In anticipation of an arctic science conference happening next month in Fairbanks, an editor asked me to write a column on climate change in the north. I told her climate stability would be the bigger...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    February 24, 2016

From Far North to Fashion Island, falcons find their niche

The upper Colville River is one of the quietest places on the planet, a land of cliffs and tundra and tangles of willow. Fashion Island is one of the most human-altered landscapes in America, where...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    February 10, 2016

Ice worms: enigmas of the north rarely seen

Recent research on the ice worm has shone some light on the tiny creature that appears when the sun sets on warmish glaciers. Few people have seen ice worms, but they are not mythical. Wispy and less...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    February 3, 2016

Polar bears walking a treadmill of ice

Stronger winds and thinner ice are forcing Alaska polar bears to work harder to remain in Alaska, according to scientists who have studied increased movements of both sea ice and bears. "There's an en...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 27, 2016

Cook Inlet Basin amplifies earthquake shaking

Millions of people live in dimples on the Earth's surface - often near the ocean, in lowlands between mountain peaks too rugged and cold. One of these global indentations, Cook Inlet Basin, recently showed another characteristic of the planet's...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 20, 2016

The case for rallying around sea ice

The ice floating on top of the world covers pretty much the entire Arctic Ocean in midwinter. By late summer it shrinks to half that much. If trends continue, by mid-century the summer ice may take up less space than Japan. As the Arctic Ocean...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 6, 2016

Impressions of a place far from everywhere - even for Alaska

ST. MATTHEW ISLAND - I'm resting on a mattress of tundra plants that are growing more than 200 miles from the nearest Alaska village. While I have snuck away here to my own private ridge top, eight other people, all scientists, are somewhere on this...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    December 16, 2015

Measuring the highest peaks in the Brooks Range

U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps give you a choice on the height of Mount Isto. Depending on what map scale you choose, the mountain in the Brooks Range is either higher or lower than 9,000...

 

Page Down