The Valdez Star - Serving Prince William Sound and Copper River Basin

 

Articles written by Ned Rozell

Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 100

 By Ned Rozell    Main News    December 10, 2014

Mastodons long gone from the north

A long, long time ago, a hairy elephant stomped the northland, wrecking trees and shrubs as it fed of twigs, leaves and bark. These mastodons left a few scattered teeth and bones in Alaska and the...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    December 3, 2014

Alaska blackfish in a class of its own

Imagine a shallow lake north of Hughes, in the cold heart of Alaska. In frigid, sluggish water, dim blue light penetrates two feet of ice. The ice has a quarter-size hole, maintained by a stream of...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    November 26, 2014

Snow-starved Alaska not the normal state

During the first 21 days of November 2014, no recordable snow fell in Anchorage, Juneau or Fairbanks. Over an unusual swath of the state, the ground was frozen, dusty and brown. Even extreme parts of Alaska were in a snow drought. "No manual...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    November 12, 2014

Northern lab cranked out the quirky and creative

"Rectal Temperature of the Working Sled Dog." "Cleaning and Sterilization of Bunny Boots." "Comparative Sweat Rates of Eskimos and Caucasians Under Controlled Conditions." These are some of the...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    November 5, 2014

Twenty weeks through the heart of Alaska

"It is a very remarkable fact that a region under a civilized government for more than a century should remain so completely unknown as the vast territory drained by the Copper, Tanana and Koyukuk...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    October 29, 2014

A green way to deal with carbon dioxide

Last week, I wrote about a thought experiment proposed by Fairbanks scientist Jim Beget. He suggests raining down crystals of a compound that captures carbon dioxide onto a frigid plateau in...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    October 22, 2014

A cool idea for locking up carbon dioxide

Jim Beget spends much of his time digging for clues from long ago, like when a volcanic island might have collapsed into the sea, sending giant waves to distant shores. He will soon engage in debate on a contemporary question: before carbon dioxide...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    October 15, 2014

Northern Alaska joins the cryosphere

It's mid-October, 118 miles from the Arctic Circle. Time for a walk to work. Since I last wrote about my three-mile commute through the raindrops of August, the 1,100 acres of boreal forest between...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    October 8, 2014

Fire on the mountain near the Yukon River

A smoking mountain near the Yukon River not far from Eagle is, after further study, still a puzzle. People first noticed acrid smoke in September 2012. The mountain has been steaming ever since, even...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    October 1, 2014

Why was interior Alaska green during the last ice age?

During our planet's most recent cold period, a slab of ice smothered Manhattan. Canada looked like Antarctica but with no protruding mountains. When the last glacial maximum peaked about 20,000 years ago, most of the continent - from the Arctic...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 24, 2014

Minto earthquakes then, now and tomorrow

MINTO - Sarah Silas, 89, smiled as she remembered an earthquake that shook her village more than 60 years ago. The floor of her cabin swayed so that her young son staggered away from her. "My...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 17, 2014

Maverick red aspens in a world of gold leaf intrigue scientists

Will Lentz, a reader from Fairbanks, asks a question that flares every fall: why do some aspens turn red? A few scientists from Fort Collins, Colorado, pondered that subject in the late 1970s....

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 10, 2014

Land of Extremes: Arctic Circle a place like no other

Slicing through the top quarter of the Alaska map, the Arctic Circle marks the boundary of perpetual light. North of the line, the sun won't set on summer solstice. But somehow the breezy, treeless...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 3, 2014

Ernest Leffingwell, scientist with a fan club

One hundred years ago, a group of men sailed to the northern coast of Alaska to find a land mass rumored to protrude from the Arctic Ocean. They did not find the land. After wintering in the north...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 27, 2014

Why don't hibernating bears get osteoporosis?

Bears have the right idea. Don't fight the cold; just shut 'er down for six months and emerge when it's warmer. Why didn't we think of that? For one thing, our bones would wither. We'd all get...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 20, 2014

High-tech bird decoy fools flycatchers

Julie Hagelin needed a fake bird. She found one in an unexpected place. The biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game is studying the mysterious olive-sided flycatcher, known for its pierci...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 13, 2014

An archaeologist's field guide to coffee cans

The year is 1905. You are a prospector in Alaska relaxing in your cabin after a chilly day of working the tailings pile. Craving a cup, you pull a tin of coffee off the shelf. Though you can't...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 6, 2014

Late summer arrives in the boreal forest

It's early August, 118 miles from the Arctic Circle. Time for a walk to work. The last time I wrote about hiking through the North Campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, summer was a puppy...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 30, 2014

Tracks across Greenland ice - 60 years apart

On top of an ice body more than two miles thick, Chris Polashenski last summer hoped to find a candy wrapper that might have fallen from Carl Benson's pocket 60 years ago. As he repeated the Alaska...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 16, 2014

Tracking salmon to their birth streams

Strontium is a trace element and mineral people use to make glow-in-the-dark paints and toothpaste for sensitive teeth. In research for his college degree, Sean Brennan used strontium's unique qualities to track salmon in an Alaska river. At...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 9, 2014

The mystery of 53 dead caribou in the Alaska Range

Forty-two years ago, an Army helicopter pilot flying over a tundra plateau saw a group of caribou. Thinking something looked weird, he circled for a closer look. The animals, dozens of them, were dead...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 2, 2014

Sparrows in Alaska sleep little during migration

Each fall, white-crowned sparrows hop off branches in Alaska and begin journeys toward California, Arizona, New Mexico and west Texas. On their trip of several weeks, flying mostly at night, the tiny songbirds may cut back on their sleep by two-third...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    June 25, 2014

Number of Alaska glaciers is everchanging

A glaciologist once wrote that the number of glaciers in Alaska "is estimated at (greater than) 100,000." That fuzzy number, perhaps written in passive voice for a reason, might be correct. But it...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    June 11, 2014

Defining the Arctic not always easy

Slicing through the top quarter of the Alaska map, the Arctic Circle marks the boundary of perpetual light. North of the line, the sun won't set on summer solstice. But somehow the breezy, treeless...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    June 4, 2014

Astronaut recruit: Alaska a good analog for space

Jessica Cherry spends her favorite moments looking at Alaska from above. As a new recruit for a class of astronaut candidates, she may someday view the world from miles higher. Cherry, 37, is a pilot...

 

Page Down