Articles written by Ned Rozell

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 By NED ROZELL    Main News    February 3, 2016 

Polar bears walking a treadmill of ice

Stronger winds and thinner ice are forcing Alaska polar bears to work harder to remain in Alaska, according to scientists who have studied increased movements of both sea ice and bears. "There's an en...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 27, 2016

Cook Inlet Basin amplifies earthquake shaking

Millions of people live in dimples on the Earth's surface - often near the ocean, in lowlands between mountain peaks too rugged and cold. One of these global indentations, Cook Inlet Basin, recently showed another characteristic of the planet's...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 20, 2016

The case for rallying around sea ice

The ice floating on top of the world covers pretty much the entire Arctic Ocean in midwinter. By late summer it shrinks to half that much. If trends continue, by mid-century the summer ice may take up less space than Japan. As the Arctic Ocean...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    January 6, 2016

Impressions of a place far from everywhere - even for Alaska

ST. MATTHEW ISLAND - I'm resting on a mattress of tundra plants that are growing more than 200 miles from the nearest Alaska village. While I have snuck away here to my own private ridge top, eight other people, all scientists, are somewhere on this...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    December 16, 2015

Measuring the highest peaks in the Brooks Range

U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps give you a choice on the height of Mount Isto. Depending on what map scale you choose, the mountain in the Brooks Range is either higher or lower than 9,000...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    December 9, 2015

Mystery of the glass tool kit in the sand

From space, the Nogahabara Dunes are a splotch of blond sand about six miles in diameter surrounded by green boreal forest. Located west of the Koyukuk River, the dunes are the site of an uncommon...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    December 2, 2015

Mystery of the dancing wires revealed

In this quiet, peaceful time of year, with all the noisy birds flown south and all the scary bears in hillside dens, little things catch our attention. Like wires that move as if by magic. Aurora...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 25, 2015

A migratory house for villages on the move

As a river eats its way into Newtok, Alaska, residents are planning their moves to a new village site 12 miles away. One family will move into a house on skis with the ability to migrate as needed...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 18, 2015

Face of northern Alaska pitted by tundra fire studied

Eight summers ago, a bolt of lightning struck a dry tundra hillside in northern Alaska. Fanned by a warm wind that curled over the Brooks Range, the Anaktuvuk River fire burned for three months,...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    November 11, 2015

Weird world of northern dinosaurs coming into focus

During Patrick Druckenmiller's not-so-restful sabbatical year, he is flying to museums around the world. In Alberta a few weeks ago and London now, the University of Alaska Museum's curator of earth science is looking at bones of dinosaurs similar...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 28, 2015

Human-powered torpedo on an Alaska island

On a damp island far out in the Aleutian chain, a secret weapon of Japan's World War II Navy sinks into the sod. A Type-A midget submarine the shape of a killer whale was one of six the Japanese...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 21, 2015

Pioneer songbird meets an early snowstorm

As piles of wet snow fell, an unexpected guest rapped at the window. My wife, Kristen, heard it bump into the glass. She was soon cupping in her hands a delicate bird she saw perched on the...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 14, 2015

Burning crude oil on water surface sparks research

On a clear day last spring, fire sizzled on water at Poker Flat Research Range in the Chatanika River valley. There, scientists were spilling crude oil in a manmade water basin and torching it from...

 
 By NED ROZELL    Main News    October 7, 2015

Urban ermine inspires weasel-related questions

While talking with two friends just inside a university entranceway, I saw a creature scampering in our direction just outside the glass doors. My first thought was of a misdirected red squirrel...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 30, 2015

Arrowheads lost (and found) in time

Dave Klein was 47 when he kicked into a scree slope in Atigun Canyon and saw something unusual in the rocks below. He reached down and picked up a three-inch wedge of bone or antler that had been...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 16, 2015

Alders go their own way in Alaska's autumn

With every autumn breath we take, Alaska brightens with yellows, reds and oranges of plants recovering what they can from tired solar panels. But one shrubby tree does not join the party. Alders remain a stubborn green. Many won't drop their leaves...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 9, 2015

Spillways of an ancient Alaska lake

Many years ago, geologists stood on the bank of the Copper River and watched Childs Glacier thunder icebergs straight into the river. Using a little imagination, one researcher remarked how an...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    September 2, 2015

New Management: HAARP again open for business

Instead of falling to the dozer blade, the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program has new life. In mid-August, U.S. Air Force General Tom Masiello shook hands with UAF's Brian Rogers and Bob...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 26, 2015

A float down the Tanana River

This is not Henry Allen's Tanana River. Nor is it the Trail River of people living here thousands of years before the nineteenth-century government explorer struggled his way down the Tanana. But it...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 12, 2015

Early death may benefit bear-pressured salmon

While snorkeling in Alaska's largest lake, Stephanie Carlson watched sockeye salmon change from aggressive red creatures with the jaws of wolves to drab, lethargic slugs. That conversion was so quick she wondered if fish that fall apart faster have...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    August 5, 2015

The loneliest camp on Earth revisited

One of the quietest places in Alaska was temporarily home to a few hardy people when the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock. An archaeologist has fleshed out what life might have been like during a winter on St. Matthew Island in the 1600s. St....

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 29, 2015

Red-backed voles climb into scientific literature

A few years ago, Link Olson wanted students in his mammalogy class to see one of the neatest little creatures in Alaska, the northern flying squirrel. He baited a few live traps with peanut butter rolled in oats and placed them in spruce trees. When...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 22, 2015

Alaska's wildfires and the changing boreal forest

In late July, more than 300 wildfires are burning in Alaska. With burned acreage totals one month ahead of the historic 2004 fire season, summer 2015 is again the year of the wildfire. Many scientists are not surprised. In papers written a few years...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 15, 2015

Northern woods filled with potential drug possibilities

Saplings of the Alaska paper birch tree produce a sticky resin on new branches that discourages snowshoe hares from eating them. Some scientists think that such chemical defenses might be useful drugs and a natural resource for Alaskans to tap. Tom...

 
 By Ned Rozell    Main News    July 8, 2015

Willow rose hosts insect drama within its beauty

From the more-you-look-the-more-you-see file, I present the willow rose. The willow rose is lovely, green, and unexpected, its whirled petals gracing the top of Alaska willows like the most delicate blossom in the cooler of a flower shop. But this...

 

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